Powered by first-party, self-declared data, Fluent’s Political Pulse offers insight into the hot button issues that matter most to US adults today. Interacting with nearly 1 million Americans daily across our owned and operated portfolio of sites, we leverage our real-time survey capabilities to better understand voter sentiment and behavior. All results are weighted based on US Census for gender, age, and income to help ensure overall representativeness.

This Week in Politics

16-year-old climate activist and Nobel Peace Prize nominee, Greta Thunberg, has made headlines for her impassioned address at The United Nations Climate Action Summit in NYC on Monday. In the past year, Thunberg has launched a global climate strike movement, motivating millions of young people to demand stronger climate action from leaders around the world.

While some delegates reconfirmed their country’s commitment to the cause (German Chancellor Angela Merkel pledged to double the country’s climate protection funding), Trump did not make any remarks during his brief appearance at the summit, later telling reporters, “I’m a big believer in clean air and clean water,” but countries “should do it for themselves.” China noted that it would continue to fulfill the promises made under the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, but did not announce any plans to expedite a transition away from fossil fuels.

Identifying environmental protections as a threat to the fossil fuel industry and other big businesses, Trump announced the US would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement in 2017. His administration has also rolled back and reversed numerous environmental protections throughout his time in office. While Democrats and Republicans still believe that gun violence is the top social issue facing the US right now, climate change ranks second in importance among Democrats (18%) and third behind income inequality for Republicans (13%). 69% of Democrats believe they will be affected by climate change in their lifetime, while less than half of Republicans (42%) share this sentiment.

In her address at the climate summit, Thunberg called out world leaders for failing to take appropriate action on the issue of climate change, saying “How dare you […] come here saying that you’re doing enough, when the politics and solutions needed are still nowhere in sight?” Overall, 69% of Americans do not believe the US government is doing enough to combat climate change. Americans from the Northeast are more likely than those from the Midwest to believe that the government should be doing more to address the global climate crisis.     

You can find more learnings from this week’s survey here. Check back weekly for new data on the most pressing political issues leading up to the 2020 presidential election.

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